Archive for November 2014

Public, meet 3D printed sculptures ….

* HIDDEN IN THE HILLS SPECIAL EDITION, PART I *

This past Friday, Saturday and Sunday I participated in the first three of a six-day studio tour in the north part of the Valley of the Sun, where I live. It gave me a great opportunity to introduce my 3D printed sculpture and jewelry – you learn a lot when you talk directly to the public.

Yes, the jewelry and some of my 3D printed sculpture debuted at Shemer Art Center‘s show “Materialize,” but I wasn’t there day in and day out. At this event, I got to talk to a lot of people. Kevin Caron's Progeny sculpturese at Hidden In The Hills

About 700 people came through during the first three days of Hidden In The Hills, which is celebrating its 18th year as a studio tour. Nearly 200 artists are showing their work in 50 studios scattered across three towns. A lot of attendees come every year; for some it is a holiday tradition.

So they are used to looking at art. There are also people who are just along for the ride, as well as a number of artists checking out the competition.

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Public, meet 3D printed sculptures

* HIDDEN IN THE HILLS SPECIAL EDITION, PART I *

This past Friday, Saturday and Sunday I participated in the first three of a six-day studio tour in the north part of the Valley of the Sun, where I live. It gave me a great opportunity to introduce my 3D printed sculpture and jewelry – you learn a lot when you talk directly to the public.

Yes, the jewelry and some of my 3D printed sculpture debuted at Shemer Art Center‘s show “Materialize,” but I wasn’t there day in and day out. At this event, I got to talk to a lot of people. Kevin Caron's Progeny sculpturese at Hidden In The Hills

About 700 people came through during the first three days of Hidden In The Hills, which is celebrating its 18th year as a studio tour. Nearly 200 artists are showing their work in 50 studios scattered across three towns. A lot of attendees come every year; for some it is a holiday tradition.

So they are used to looking at art. There are also people who are just along for the ride, as well as a number of artists checking out the competition.

Read More →

The Making

It is possible to create art with a 3D printer without having a 3D printer. I’ve seen many beautiful sculptures created by service bureaus such as Shapeways. Bathsheba design on Shapeways site

Because machines interest me, though, printing my 3D designs myself seemed natural. Understanding how something comes to be is important to me. Creating it myself is part of the point.

(At some moment, so it might as well be now, I must make clear I do use outside 3D printers, or service bureaus, for certain projects, just as I sometimes send my sculptures out to be sandblasted or painted. All of these are situations in which my equipment or capabilities are not equal to my own imagination.)

That being said, I’ve had some interesting surprises along the plastic brick road ….

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‘Don’t you just push a button?’

When I got involved in 3D printing, I understood that I was on the “bleeding edge” – it wasn’t the first time, and it probably won’t be the last. I love to learn, and my curiosity has taken me to some pretty awesome places.

When I got my first 3D printer, I knew there’d be a learning curve, and that the software and hardware would evolve quickly. But of course, you don’t ever think about how much ….

That being said, sometimes people think it’s as simple as pushing a button: “Don’t you just put in the software and say go?”

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