Archive for 3D printer filament – Page 2

String theory: removing strings from a 3D printed sculpture

Close up of 3D printed sculpture Love and Marriage - Kevin CaronPrinting big sculptures on my 8-foot-tall Cerberus 3D Gigante printer is a balance of heat and cool.

As discussed in a previous post, I installed a heated bed on the printer, which helps keep the base of my large format 3D-printed sculptures adhered to the bed during the multiple days of many prints. (Some prints have taken four days. Keeping an eye on a print that long 24 hours a day, switching out spools of filament, adjusting speeds, etc., is definitely not for the faint of heart!)

As the sculptures print, though, I cool them down with fans. My fan of choice right now is a 4-foot-tall oscillating tower fan.

The cooling is especially important when the upper sections of a sculpture narrow, as many of mine do. When they narrow like that, I also turn down print speed to avoid burning on any edges.

The result is spiderweb like strings, or threads, that cool as the hotend moves. They sometimes run between sections almost like the warp, or horizontal threads, in a weaving ….

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3D Printing Filament Comes Out of the Closet

The Point, a 3D-printed bronze sculpture - Kevin CaronI’ve written about applying finishes to the surface of a 3D-printed resin sculpture, but today there are a lot more options for types of the resin filament itself.

Nearly everyone has heard about exotic 3D printing that use biomaterials, titanium, etc. but I’m talking here about filament that mere mortals like me can use in their own 3D printers.

I have 3D-printed in bronze, as you can see at right in my 26″ tall sculpture The Point. That filament is 80% bronze and 20% resin. I’ve printed both a small version of this form on my Cerberus 3D 250 and the larger version on my 8-foot-tall Cerberus 3D Gigante 3D printer.

I don’t have as many choices for my Gigante, though, which requires 5-pound spools of filament for my large prints – unless I want to “weld” together filament from 1-pound spools – providing I can get 3 millimeter filament in that type – and rewind it , which isn’t an entirely crazy idea.

Yet the new materials you can actually print in are staggering. And they aren’t just facsimiles, either. The filaments are actually a mixture of the material and resin, so you are literally printing in these amazing materials ….
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The Strange Case of the 3D printed Geared Ball

Geared sphere - 3D printed by Kevin CaronIf you read my last blog post, you know I’ve been playing around with some cool designs from Thingiverse.

Both are geared – one is a cube, the other a ball. You can see me playing with them in that last blog post – several people have remarked they are like a modern Rubik’s Cube. I’ve taken a geared cube to events and people just can’t stop handling it.

Lately, I’ve been having fun enlarging the designs to print on my 8-foot-tall Cerberus 3D Gigante 3D printer, something that was a whole lot harder than I thought it would be – it isn’t just a matter of scaling up mathematically.

I’ve also been adding stripes to cubes while printing (another good reason to check out last week’s post to see me manipulate one).

But the point of this post is the strange thing I discovered after I printed the large black geared ball (right) ….

When you 3D print a geared cube, you print all the pieces at the same time. With the geared balls, you print all nine pieces – four large ones, four small ones and a middle – separately.

Difference between PLA and ABS 3D printed filament - Kevin CaronUsing my 3D Systems CubeX 3D printer, I had printed six of the pieces in black ABS filament for this 5″ geared ball when I realized I wasn’t going to have enough to print the last three pieces.

So I found some black 1.71 mm PLA filament, which is what the CubeX runs, and figured, “What the hell – filament is filament.”

After the last three pieces printed, I bought some 1/4 x 20 Allen bolts to assemble it, just as I’d done with a 2-1/2″ gray version I’d printed earlier.

But the black geared ball just wouldn’t go together. It probably took me two hours to assemble the gray one, but the black one probably took me three.

Finally, I realized that the three pieces I printed in PLA resin were slightly larger – the photo at right shows one of the smaller pieces protruding slightly.

I’d heard that PLA resin shrinks less, and this seems to prove it.

I want to try playing with this some more, comparing PLA to ABS, but since I finally got the black geared ball together, I’m happy for now.

Getting to Solid

Opioid, a 3D printed fine art sculpture - Kevin CaronLike most things, when you start looking below the surface, you find all sorts of nuances that make you realize that there is more than you realized to whatever you are doing. Well, at least to do it right!

For instance, I’d never thought about how to make a flat surface using 3D printing. After all, I do it all the time with metal – I make a very similar form to what you’ll see below to use as the strikers in most of my sound sculptures.

Besides, when I 3D print sculptures (or anything else), I have large expanses of filament. As you can see at right in my latest 3D print, Opioid, I have large expanses of solid filament “fabric,” but they aren’t horizontal. The printer does a fine job of creating these 3D printed “skins,” even in large sections.

But what if you want to create a flat surface? How does the 3D printer go from, say, printing the edges of something to filling in the area between the edges, especially if it is a pretty large expanse?

Well, that is a different story altogether …. Read More →

100-year-old machine solves my 21st century 3D printing problem

Scale - 3D printing blog by Kevin CaronSometimes working with 3D printing is like discovering a new continent. You never know what goldmine you’re going to discover – or sinkhole you just stepped into.

Fortunately, most of the time I unearth goldmines. This time, I found yet another. What I didn’t expect was that I’d be using apparently timeless 100-year-old technology to solve a 21st century problem.

For a long time, I’ve been a bit frustrated because my 3D printer host software tells me how many millimeters of filament a print will take.

That is only of limited help, though, because filament manufacturers sell their product based on weight (kilograms or pounds) ….

 

So knowing how much filament you need for a job has been a real conundrum. Armed with the magic of the Internet, though, I was determined to find some way to know how much filament I have and how much I need for a 3D printing job …..

I began searching for measuring tools, thinking I’d find something digital. I did, but I also found the perfect tool that just happens to be really, really old.

Enjoy this video, which explains what I found and shows how it works perfectly ….

 

 

3D printing filament welder to save money and stress

Because of the size of its prints, running Cerberus 3D’s Gigante 3D printer makes filament Spools of 3D printer filament - Kevin Caronhandling a real challenge. I’m using 5 pound spools of 3 millimeter filament right now, but if I could find 10, 15 or even 20 pound spools I’d definitely use them.

Why? Well, when you’re running a multiday print, you go through a lot of filament. I’ve spent many a night waiting to change filament spools – well, that was until I figured out I could just switch a nearly finished spool for a fresh one before I went to bed.

I would never have done that, though, if I hadn’t already ordered the handy, dandy filament welder I got recently (yeah, I think it’s funny, too, that it’s called a filament “welder” – just one more welder in my toolshed!) ….

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Changing 3D printing filament is now so much easier ….

Sometimes change is imposed upon us (make that “Often change is …”). Anyway, sometimes (often?) that change is good, and that’s the case with how I now am changing my filament on my Cerberus 3D Gigante 3D printer.

Last month, the teeth on the Gigante’s extruder motor got stripped, which required me to order a new extruder. That actually worked out well – I was between one of my own prints, Redhead, and beginning a 3D printed commissioned sculpture.

When I got the new extruder, I discovered I could just pause the print to change the filament instead of having to do it on the fly, the way I had been doing it:

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Day and night: what I’ve learned about 3D printing

When you work on something for a while, it’s easy to forget how far you’ve come. You know: it’s that old frog in the pot metaphor, except the outcome is sometimes – as in this case – positive.

Change happens, even if it seems like it didn’t.

I’m getting a good reminder of that right now as I recreate a project I did about 10 months ago that apparently didn’t end as well as I’d hoped ….

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Bits and pieces: using 3D printing filament ends ….

3D printing filament - Kevin CaronI read an article that contended that one of the advantages of 3D printing was that it saves resources. ROFLMAO!

That article was clearly written by someone who has never used a 3D printer.

Sure, if you have tweaked everything to perfection or are very fortunate, you have no waste. But the truth is that there’s a lot of wasted filament in failed prints. There are also stub ends – the little bits of filament left over that aren’t of much use in a print ……

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Outsmarting the filament bulge

As we narrow down where our challenges are with the Cerberus 3D Gigante printer – we’ve wrestled with software, hardware and filament issues – we’ve at least found one way to deal with the dreaded filament bulge.

How filament can be anything but a consistent size from beginning to end eludes me, but as we covered in a previous post, we’ve had a couple of bulges that stThis is supposed to be 3 mm filament - Kevin Caronopped the extruder cold. But then, what could you expect when 3 millimeter filament is more than 3.47 millimeters wide? In fact, the filament is supposed to be under 3 millimeter – about 2.95 mm – but  in places this filament wasn’t even close and the extruder couldn’t handle it.

While Ultimachine figures out what went wrong, I had to come up with some sort of solution on this end to finish printing this 30″ tall pedestal. So I came up with what I call an FCD, a Fiendishly Clever Device, so I could keep printing ….

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