Archive for art show

3D-printed sculpture storms Tucson

A visitor to the Sculpture Tucson art show watches a Cerberus 3D 250 3D printer printing - Kevin CaronOK, maybe I went a little overboard in the headline, but I’m still really jazzed at the reception of my 3D-printed sculpture at the recent Sculpture Tucson show in, yes, Tucson, Arizona (is there another Tucson? Hmmm, I’ll have to look that up ….)

The turnout at the show was incredible. Preliminary estimates say that 4,300 people came through in just 2-1/2 days April 6 – 8.

Although the show was outside at Brandi Fenton Park, I had my Cerberus 3D 250 running the whole time. Amazingly enough, it only failed once when the wind got the best of it, but overall, it performed beautifully.

It also fascinated people. A few people who came by knew about 3D printing, but most visitors had never seen a 3D printer running before. That meant I did a lot of education, which is how it usually goes when I have the printer running at an event.

We actually apologized to the artists around us, who had to hear the spiel over and over and over again. The challenge was always explaining it like I’d never said it before, but what I would say seldom varied (“… start in CAD …” “… the filament comes down from here …” “… like a big glue gun …”) ….

Read More →

Art show puts spotlight on my 3D printed sculpture

Endless Line art show of 3D printed sculpture by Kevin CaronI’ve had my 3D printed sculpture in a number of shows, but thus far it’s either been in an exhibit with other people’s 3D printed work, like the Shemer Art Center 2014 show “Materialize,” or as just pieces in an art show, like last year’s  show at MonOrchid, “Ten Modern Abstract.”

Finally, it was time for a show dedicated to my 3D printed sculpture.

I’m deeply fortunate that I was approached by Robrt Pela, the highly talented curator, writer and critic to do a show – well, actually two shows, but that’s another story altogether.

This one, called “Endless Line,” would feature the largest single exhibition of my large and small format 3D printed sculpture, really putting my work out there for comment and criticism ….

 

For the 3D printed sculpture show, Robrt chose the Walter Art Gallery, which is part of Walter Productions, a maker space that features, among other things, a brewery, artist studios and the gallery. Most famously, it’s the home of Walter the Bus, which many people know from the Burning Man festival.

Displaying and lighting these sculptures was a real challenge. First, most of them are in a single, saturated color. That meant they had to be placed carefully so that each sculpture complemented the others. Fortunately, they had enough space to place each sculpture so it could be circumnavigated. That is invaluable with any sculpture. Lighting was tricky because some of the sculptures are printed in translucent filament, like the luminous Sunscraper, which had actually sold before the show even began.

Copper Cuff, a 3D printed sculpture by Kevin CaronSome of the sculptures, including Glance and Copper Cuff (right), have patinas on them, but the majority have the shiny surface of filament, which made it challenging to not just reflect a glare from them. Lighting master Todd Grossman finally settled on making the light work best at night when the opening and closing receptions were held.

I brought my Cerberus 3D 250 deltabot 3D printer and set it up to print a small sculpture. We had my jewelry set up for sale, too.

Everything was ready by the time of the opening on Friday, February 5. Our hosts were even nice enough to bring Walter the Bus out and turn on his undulating neon lights to welcome visitors.

And come they did.

It was fascinating to watch people, listen to their comments and answer their questions. Many of them didn’t yet understand how 3D printing even works when they came in the door. After explaining the process to hundreds of people over the last few years, I think I was able to explain it to them in such a way that most of them got it before they left.

Others were fascinated by the filament. I overheard someone flicking Sunscraper with her nails. I only cringed a little.

Some preferred the patinated pieces. No one, at least that I heard, was turned off by what they saw or denied this was art. In fact, most of them were blown away, which felt great. I also overhead conversations about 3D printing in general – what people are already doing and what the future may bring.

I think I gained some new fans with this show, and I know we educated a lot of people. I came away more confident than ever that people understand that 3D printing may be new and, for now, novel, but that it’s simply another tool in artists’ quivers.

The closing reception for the show is Friday, February 26 at 6 p.m. at the Walter Art Gallery, 6425 E. Thomas Rd. in Scottsdale, Arizona.

3D printed art still opening eyes

With the International Sculpture Conference in town at the beginning of November, I made it a The crowd at the opening for Ten: Modern Abstract at monOrchid Shade Gallery, Phoenix, Arizonapoint to have as much work visible as possible. Sure, many of the attendees were not necessarily art buyers, but they are art lovers. Too, artists usually appreciate outliers like me, people who don’t play by the rules.

Creating sculpture with 3D printing isn’t that unusual – there are plenty of artists out there doing it – a Google search for 3D printed sculpture brought back 1,440,000 results (admittedly, this isn’t a scientific study, but still!).

That being said, very few artists are printing their own work, much less doing so with a printer that can create sculptures as tall as 4-1/2 feet.

So when I got the chance to have some of my large format 3D-printed sculptures at one of the most popular galleries in downtown Phoenix, I jumped on it ….

Read More →

A feast of 3D printed artwork

For many months, the Shemer Art Center has been preparing for what is currently a relative rarity: an art show featuring 3D printing.

It’s been a long time coming, so the opening was particularly exciting for many of us. I have three sculptures in the show – Simple Planes With Aquamarine Stripe, Holy Cannoli and SpiritHole Sunset – which features the work of more than 20 artists from around the United States.

It’s fascinating to see some of the materials that people are printing in, including plaster, and what they are printing with it.

Read More →