Archive for fine art sculpture

Breakthrough: ‘playing around’ leads to intriguing visual development

Detail of 3D printed sculpture Looking In - Kevin CaronI learn by doing. Yes, I also research, read, watch videos and gain knowledge in other ways, but mostly I play and push beyond what I already know to learn more.

A lot of my sculptures, such as Knot Me and subsequent artworks based on what I learned from tipping a trefoil knot on one corner, are a result of “I wonder what will happen if I do this ….”

That very sort of “following my curiosity,” as author Elizabeth Gilbert calls it, is what has led to one of the most exciting developments I’ve encountered yet in 3D printing.

As you know, if you’ve read this blog or watched my site, Instagram or Facebook for any time, I’ve been using 3D printing to create sculptures for about 5 years. I’ve enjoyed developing my own style of flowing, sometimes twisting and even angular forms, some of which are near to if not impossible to make in metal.

But this latest development, the result of playing with settings, is creating an entirely new look for my sculptures …. Read More →

Metal filler works wonders with ABS filament

An as-yet-untitled 3D printed fine art sculpture by Phoenix artist Kevin Caron.Since I moved my 3D Systems CubeX 3D printer down to the studio, I’ve been able to play with it while I’m in the office cooling down – Arizona summers are really brutal when you work with fire and wear heavy protective gear. The CubeX gives me another way to play that keeps me under 1000 degrees.

One reason I hang onto this old 3D printer – it was the first one I owned – is that it prints ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) filament (the same stuff used in Lego bricks), which is petroleum-based. Although I mostly print in PLA (polylactic acid), ABS lets me do some things I can’t do with PLA.

In particular, it lets me print the two forms shown in this post, which my deltabot printers’ software just can’t seem to handle. The CubeX software can handle the thin edges better and print pieces without supports, which means much far less clean up. It also lets me use a filler that PLA probably wouldn’t put up with.

Accordingly, I decided to create these two forms for an upcoming show. I knew they wouldn’t print perfectly, though, so some body work was in my future ….

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Public, meet 3D printed sculptures ….

* HIDDEN IN THE HILLS SPECIAL EDITION, PART I *

This past Friday, Saturday and Sunday I participated in the first three of a six-day studio tour in the north part of the Valley of the Sun, where I live. It gave me a great opportunity to introduce my 3D printed sculpture and jewelry – you learn a lot when you talk directly to the public.

Yes, the jewelry and some of my 3D printed sculpture debuted at Shemer Art Center‘s show “Materialize,” but I wasn’t there day in and day out. At this event, I got to talk to a lot of people. Kevin Caron's Progeny sculpturese at Hidden In The Hills

About 700 people came through during the first three days of Hidden In The Hills, which is celebrating its 18th year as a studio tour. Nearly 200 artists are showing their work in 50 studios scattered across three towns. A lot of attendees come every year; for some it is a holiday tradition.

So they are used to looking at art. There are also people who are just along for the ride, as well as a number of artists checking out the competition.

Read More →

Public, meet 3D printed sculptures

* HIDDEN IN THE HILLS SPECIAL EDITION, PART I *

This past Friday, Saturday and Sunday I participated in the first three of a six-day studio tour in the north part of the Valley of the Sun, where I live. It gave me a great opportunity to introduce my 3D printed sculpture and jewelry – you learn a lot when you talk directly to the public.

Yes, the jewelry and some of my 3D printed sculpture debuted at Shemer Art Center‘s show “Materialize,” but I wasn’t there day in and day out. At this event, I got to talk to a lot of people. Kevin Caron's Progeny sculpturese at Hidden In The Hills

About 700 people came through during the first three days of Hidden In The Hills, which is celebrating its 18th year as a studio tour. Nearly 200 artists are showing their work in 50 studios scattered across three towns. A lot of attendees come every year; for some it is a holiday tradition.

So they are used to looking at art. There are also people who are just along for the ride, as well as a number of artists checking out the competition.

Read More →