Archive for indoor sculpture

Double trouble: Is it original or a print?

Multiples of Sunscraper, a 3D printed fine art sculpture - Kevin Caron Most people who have wondered if 3D printed sculptures are art have now realized that 3D printers themselves are simply tools, like paintbrushes, potters’ wheels and cameras.

With 3D printing, however, some people continue to fear that once artists create their original CAD designs, they will then simply print popular sculptures over and over, creating the sort of “copies” 2D artists make with offset prints and giclees. Many in the art world are bothered when artists offer inexpensive (or sometimes not so inexpensive) copies of their work this way.

For me, although it is, of course, technically possible to print multiples, whether to do so is really a philosophical issue. I had to consciously consider and develop this philosophy as a lodestar for my 3D-printed creations.

Sure, once a design has proven popular, I could simply reprint multiples, but that isn’t something I choose to do any more than I do it when I create sculptures in metal. In metal, it is a little trickier to recreate a form exactly, which would be quite easy with 3D printing. Still, I think there are issues for patrons if they feel they are not really buying an original.

My philosophy is straightforward, but took a little time to think through ….

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3D Printing Filament Comes Out of the Closet

The Point, a 3D-printed bronze sculpture - Kevin CaronI’ve written about applying finishes to the surface of a 3D-printed resin sculpture, but today there are a lot more options for types of the resin filament itself.

Nearly everyone has heard about exotic 3D printing that use biomaterials, titanium, etc. but I’m talking here about filament that mere mortals like me can use in their own 3D printers.

I have 3D-printed in bronze, as you can see at right in my 26″ tall sculpture The Point. That filament is 80% bronze and 20% resin. I’ve printed both a small version of this form on my Cerberus 3D 250 and the larger version on my 8-foot-tall Cerberus 3D Gigante 3D printer.

I don’t have as many choices for my Gigante, though, which requires 5-pound spools of filament for my large prints – unless I want to “weld” together filament from 1-pound spools – providing I can get 3 millimeter filament in that type – and rewind it , which isn’t an entirely crazy idea.

Yet the new materials you can actually print in are staggering. And they aren’t just facsimiles, either. The filaments are actually a mixture of the material and resin, so you are literally printing in these amazing materials ….
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Public, meet 3D printed sculptures ….

* HIDDEN IN THE HILLS SPECIAL EDITION, PART I *

This past Friday, Saturday and Sunday I participated in the first three of a six-day studio tour in the north part of the Valley of the Sun, where I live. It gave me a great opportunity to introduce my 3D printed sculpture and jewelry – you learn a lot when you talk directly to the public.

Yes, the jewelry and some of my 3D printed sculpture debuted at Shemer Art Center‘s show “Materialize,” but I wasn’t there day in and day out. At this event, I got to talk to a lot of people. Kevin Caron's Progeny sculpturese at Hidden In The Hills

About 700 people came through during the first three days of Hidden In The Hills, which is celebrating its 18th year as a studio tour. Nearly 200 artists are showing their work in 50 studios scattered across three towns. A lot of attendees come every year; for some it is a holiday tradition.

So they are used to looking at art. There are also people who are just along for the ride, as well as a number of artists checking out the competition.

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Public, meet 3D printed sculptures

* HIDDEN IN THE HILLS SPECIAL EDITION, PART I *

This past Friday, Saturday and Sunday I participated in the first three of a six-day studio tour in the north part of the Valley of the Sun, where I live. It gave me a great opportunity to introduce my 3D printed sculpture and jewelry – you learn a lot when you talk directly to the public.

Yes, the jewelry and some of my 3D printed sculpture debuted at Shemer Art Center‘s show “Materialize,” but I wasn’t there day in and day out. At this event, I got to talk to a lot of people. Kevin Caron's Progeny sculpturese at Hidden In The Hills

About 700 people came through during the first three days of Hidden In The Hills, which is celebrating its 18th year as a studio tour. Nearly 200 artists are showing their work in 50 studios scattered across three towns. A lot of attendees come every year; for some it is a holiday tradition.

So they are used to looking at art. There are also people who are just along for the ride, as well as a number of artists checking out the competition.

Read More →