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How to MIG Weld in Tight Places



A viewer emailed Kevin and said it was nice to show us how to weld in tight areas with a TIG welder, but what if all someone has is a MIG welder?

Kevin shows a really tight angle that normally would be really hard to reach into.

The first solution he offers is to simply get rid of the joint. Instead of putting two pieces of metal together and then trying to reach into the deep angle, just cut almost all the way through the metal and bend it. That means no weld inside the joint. Then you can just add metal to finish off your angle and you'll have all outside welds.

If the plans - or the boss - says you can't do that, Kevin recommends using a gusset that fits down into the joint. That fills the joint in so all you have is two outside welds and two inside welds that aren't so difficult to reach.

If the boss says you can't use a gusset, how about stick welding (arc welding) the joint? Kevin shows how a 3/32nd 6011 electrode fits nicely into the joint. You can stick weld that joint and use your MIG welder on the rest of the welds.

Another option is to use oxygen-acetylene welding. Oxy acetylene welders' small tips fits nicely into the joint.

Kevin is ready to try some of these solutions, including a trick that just might work ....

First he is going to weld the gusset into the joint. He's using the Everlast PowerMTS 251si, their multipurpose machine. He MIG welds the short section of gusset into place (if you were actually welding your project, your gusset would run the length of the joint). That was pretty easy. It fills in the gap and gives you a nice strong joint. Then you can do the rest of your welds.

Next Kevin tries something that just might work. He bumps up the wirefeed and the regulator pressure and MIG welds it with a little more stick out than usual and more gas flow to help bridge the gap.

He went from 275 inches per minute to 300, and from 15 CFH to 20. Kevin is hoping that the gusset - or a dam would work, too - will allow the inert gas to flood the area and force out the oxygen, allowing a decent weld.

Kevin welds down inside that gap and gets a pretty good looking weld.

He's ready to go back to work, so you might want to stick around one more moment to hear the Voice speechless ....


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