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"Kevin's work is so incredible! I was thrilled to see his creations. I love the look of steel as art, and outdoors, it just weathers so beautifully. And I love that he incorporates sound into his art."
--Amy Cooper, Landscape Designer, Amy Cooper Designs, Phoenix, Arizona



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Cutting Stainless Steel Donut Feet for a Metal Sculpture



The Voice: Hey, Kevin. What are you doing?

Kevin Caron: I've got a pretty big mess here in the studio right now. I'm making some little feet to go underneath a contemporary art sculpture that I made.

Right now I'm cutting little donuts out of this quarter-inch piece of stainless steel that will sit on the base. Then I will take my sculpture (let me show you) and weld these little feet right onto the bottom of the base like so.

If this sculpture were to sit on these three tiny little points, it would be so fragile; so delicate, that even just the breeze from an open window would cause it to wiggle around and fall over. So I make these little round metal rings just to fit on the bottom and make it more stable.

I find that working with this stainless is kind of weird. It doesn't cut quite as easily as steel does.

When I'm cutting with a hole saw, there's a lot of heat generated with this tool, so I?m going very slowly, feeding the bit very slowly down into the metal.

I've got plain motor oil in an oil can, and I keep that groove flooded with oil, easing it through so that I don't overheat the bit or discolor the stainless.

Afterward I clean them up on the grinder, weld them onto the base and we?re good to go.

See you next time.

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