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Cutting Metal Pieces and Welding a Seamless Look on Sculpture

The Voice: Hey, Kevin. What are you doing?

Kevin Caron: This monster is a new bell stand for a large metal bell I'm fabricating here in the studio. I'm thinking the working title is Bobby Pin, because it kind of looks like one.

It's all eighth-inch-thick by 3-inch-wide steel plate with harrow discs for feet. It's got a nice little twist to the top of it up there.

Now I'm trying to close in the legs and fill in the feet. I'll fill in all this down in here and grind it all smooth and try to round it off a bit so it goes from a circle to a square.

It's about 8 feet tall and it'll be about 8 feet from side to side once the fabrication is complete. I have a long way to go yet, but we're getting there. We're having fun.

The Voice: How are you fitting those pieces?

Kevin Caron: One at a time...I cut off the bottom and get the fit right down here, then go to the slip roll and get the curve in it so I can fit it into the rest of them.

Then I have to reach inside and trace my line inside so I can pick up the angle, then I cut it with the shear or with the plasma cutter so I can get that piece to fit inside, just like this one.

I fit them in, tack them in one spot, hammer them in a little and shape them. I get them to fit nicely; then I weld them in and move on to the next one.




Kevin Caron: Boy, the neighbors love me.

I've got a lot of fitting to do yet. See you in the next how-to video.

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